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20130121
20130129
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KQED (PBS) 45
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pockets, but we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
of europe's content. in belgium, more people turn to handouts to survive the growing economy. -- the grim economy. the russian parliament about a draft law banning homosexual propaganda. there was only one deputy that voted against it in the lower house. outside, passion spilled over to scuffles on the street. police made arrests after the gay-rights supporters were insulted by opponents. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. >> ahead of the debate inside the russian parliament, there was drama outside on the street. gay-rights activists. police detained 20 people. later, military police turned their attention to the controversial bill. pass the first hearing by a huge margin. it will prohibit the spread of homosexual propaganda in the wording which presence of children. it would mean across russia public events promoting gay rights could be broken up and the organizers find -- fined. >> we see open propaganda that harms. young people will decide on their own how to live in the future and what orientation to choose. >> this draft bill sends a bad signal to society of repression and limitat
on the economy. and, we've seen autos really rebounding over the last year. we're really starting to see improvement in the housing market. so, i think those are some very fundamental pieces of the economy that could really lead to some stronger growth in the future. >> reporter: as for retail investors rediscovering stocks this january, not everyone thinks the reunion is for real. some experts say the market will have to rally a lot longer before that happens. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from a smartphone in your hand to a smartphone in your glasses, still ahead, the latest fashion trend: wearable technology. exxon-mobil is back on top. it's reclaimed the coveted title as the world's most valuable company. apple now slips to number two. exxon is worth an estimated $417 billion and apple is $4 billion less. since apple hit $700 a share in september. it has lost roughly $250 billion in value. the change comes exactly one year after the tech titan knocked the oil giant out of the top spot. shares of microsoft ended flat today, after posting quarterly results last night tha
. >> for the last two years, we've heard from our republican colleagues economic uncertainty is bad for the economy. guess what? it is. and yet that's exactly what you are doing. another big dose of economic uncertainty. >> reporter: republicans shifted gears on the debt ceiling after a strategy session last week. worried that they have lost the public debate, republicans were clearly trying out a new message today. >> balancing the budget over the next ten years means we save the future for our kids and our grandkids. it also means that we strengthen programs like social security and medicare and medicaid that can't continue to exist in current form without some kind of controls. >> reporter: there is just one problem. democrats argue the "no budget no pay provision" violates the constitution's 27th amendment which says any changes congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better v
wasn't expecting him to give a detailed analysis of the economy today and what needs to be changed. i'm not suggesting that's not important but i was hearing him speak about lofty ideas of equality and freedom >> brown: yet he did point to some specific things as we heard in gwen's set-up >> that is true when it came to global warming or addressing the global climate change, i think we have to be willing to address these things. >> brown: trey grayson, what did you hear? >> i heard a pretty visionary, pretty articulate speech, articulate in a progressive vision for the country. i would agree with ramesh that the lack of the economy or references to the deficit in his speech was a little surprising given that that's the... probably the biggest issue of today (audio is) the fiscal cliff and everything else. and the fact that that was the number one issue on voters' minds even at the thematic level that was missing and a bit of a surprise >> brown: to stay with you, were you surprised by the emphasis on things such as gay rights or climate change, some of the specifics that he did point
. we need to reform the system for the economy and for american families. >> and what she told me is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel ve
, or maybe it's that the economy is finally building a stronger foundation. whatever the cause, the effect is that the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all are up more than 4% in the first three weeks of this year. wall street veteran art cashin says with interest rates still so low, investors have a new taste for equities, particularly pension funds. >> they've got to up their risk profile, and therefore they're going to buy stocks. and some of that money is coming in not wildly, not open-armed, but somewhat reluctantly. but this is the only road i can take. >> reporter: even with all the positive momentum on wall street, there's still a bit of nervousness about earnings season. less than 20% of s&p 500 names have reported, and so far the results are just okay. a close look at the numbers show 62% of companies have topped wall street expectations. that's in line with the average since 1994 but below the 65% of the past year. still, it's the red flags companies like dupont are raising about this year that are getting noticed. today, the largest u.s. chemical firm tempered expectations about its
where we are not really seeing other signs of the economy reinforce it. i'd like to see some reinforcing signals and we're not, but for the time being two weeks of numbers this low are very tantalizing. >> reporter: jobless claims are now at roughly the same level they were in early 2008. also, don't forget that up until this week's cold-weather snap, temperatures were unseasonably warm, letting builders continue projects in what would typically be snowy weather. >> temperatures have been above normal and typically when you do have above normal temperatures economic activity and in particular jobless claims do show some bias for exaggerated improvement that perhaps we may not get the layoffs that are typical around this year in particular in the construction industry. >> reporter: construction is expected to continue to be strong, estimates have the industry adding as many as 140,000 jobs this year, that's up from a meager 18,000 in 2012. but construction is just one sector, and, much like the weather in january, the jobs picture could go from hot to cold just as easily. ruben ramirez,
the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big
for sure where the economy is going. we don't know if that was a temporary thing. we don't know if it was money that came in early because of the federal tax concerns and the people who are the most wealthy in california paying early. the bottom line is we don't really know what those revenues are. i think the governor wants to wait and see what they are before he starts talking about those restorations. you know what, one of the really fascinating things in this speech, the governor made a point of saying, you know, just giving money back to people only to take it away when the economy goes bad is cruel. it's not progressive. it is bad politics. it's bad for the people. it's bad governing. i'm not going to go back and do that. i think you are going to hear the governor make this time and again that we want these programs, but if it's not long-term sustainable money, we shouldn't be spending it. >> since you're talking about long-term projects, john, he still wants the water tunnels. he still wants high-speed rail. how realistic are those goals given that there's so much uncerta
. >> narrator: the economy was in ruins and wall street bankers were being blamed. bankers admitted they had miscalculated. but they were also worried that they could be held criminally liable for fraud. >> he and president obama will continue to work on... >> narrator: with a new administration arriving in washington, bankers and their attorneys expected investigations and at least some prosecutions. >> ...$150 billion in mortgage-backed securities. >> smith: was there a sense that there were going to be prosecutions of alleged fraud related to the mortgage crisis? >> i think there was that expectation. i think people had seen the financial crisis. there was obviously a lot of conduct that had gone on that was improper. and i think people were expecting to see some substantial prosecutions. >> the men and women who duped would-be homeowners, who defrauded the american investor, need to be identified, prosecuted, convicted and thrown in jail. >> narrator: in washington, there was broad support for prosecuting wall street. >> i was really upset about what went on on wall street that brought a
a decent economy here if working people have no rights. if people can't bargain with their employer, there is no place in the world where people who bargain can't raise their wages. i think our strategy is to link core issues together so that it's not just, quote, labor or particularly organized labor. as you said, 12%, and that includes the public sector. private sector is under 7%. it's not just labor talking about workers' rights, it's all of us who have a vision of economic justice. let's do something about economic inequality. let's figure out how to stig stigmatize the rising economy. i was at a meeting in california of young new stewards on saturday. this is 7 to 10 years. i've been doing this my whole life. i may not be there at the end of that period, but i'm sure, absolutely certain, that without that kind of basic movement in this country, not just the traditional union agenda, we don't have a chance. on the other hand, with that kind of agenda, i absolutely believe we can change this country as president obama talked about in 2008. the change you can believe in, the chan
for the economy in the face of the continual global crisis. thirdly, a governmental responsibility for yearning for a real peace. enhancement approved equality in network -- enhancement of equality in work, and a reduction in the price of living and the reduction in coalition housing in israel. >> benjamin netanyahu speaking there. what will a new and israeli government mean for the middle east? >> just listen to the list of priorities that we just heard from benjamin netanyahu. the last of the list was about improving economic conditions of life. the third was stopping iran from getting nuclear weapons -- the first was stopping iran from getting nuclear weapons. and the third was about a real peace. this is making the case that israel's interests come first. that is something that will cause real concern and anxiety, confronting iran, across this region. what does real peace with the palestinians mean? there is much skepticism across the middle east, even israel as well, about whether he wants to pursue a two-state solution. >> there was a higher than expected turnout, which could also shake u
thing i would say i think he needs to think about the economy even if it's beginning to recover there's still a problem for the manufacturing base not being here, for are kids not being trained correctly, for getting more jobs that are really good jobs for people here. there's a lot of ideas that have been put forth but they need to be focused in a certain way, the idea if you work hard you really can get ahead in this country just like people did in the old days. >> rose: i want to come back to that. michael. >> there are all sorts of reasons for optimism but since we're talking about history, one cautionary note. lbj at the beginning of 1965 i think bob will confirm this, said to his staff you may think i can do anything. big land lied, big democratic congress. actually i got six months because i'm going to ask members of congress to make sacrifices. they're going to start rebelling and it turns out much what we think was a great society was passed at the very beginning of that term. >> rose: what's the window of opportunity, is it a hundred days. >> six, maybe eight months. >> ro
is effective what, they mean is they've lined up support for sanctions and they're hurting the iranian economy. but the-- unfortunately, the-- what hasn't yet happened is it hasn't slowed down the program to a point
looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
in the wind. we are dismantling our economy to do absolutely nothing for the global climate. if you have china and india do what we are doing, intending to do, you would actually make a change that would make a difference. otherwise, what we're doing is dismantling our industry and essentially exporting it to china and india, where all of the carbon pollution is coming from. >> dealing with china and india is the job of the state department. hillary clinton. >> we were misled and there were protests and that the assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, we have four dead americans because of a protest or was it guys out for a walk that decided they would kill americans? what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and figure out -- do everything we can to prevent it from happening again. >> the issue was the attack on our consulate in benghazi, took four lives, and with reference from we just heard, susan rice's comments on tv. one member of congress said clinton had allowed the consulate to become a death trap. what have we learned from th
, brought in bob gates and began to move to slightly more of a center position before the economy collapsed. >> rose: so what's the challenge for president obama in the second term? >> it's immense, brendan sullivan one of the great defense lawyers here in washington always says when you're in a negotiation and you have the upper hand as obama has had in the first term and may continue in the second term, when you have that upper hand and you beat your opponent you need to let them leave the field with dignity. and that is not obama's style. if you google "obama rebukes republicans" it goes on and on and on. he is always going after the people -- his beating. just a tactically i think that's a mistake and hopefully it will change. on the foreign affairs front if you talk to the intelligence people they say that the world is increasingly dangerous, you have meltdown situations potential meltdown situations not just in syria and the middle east, pakistan, north korea which has the bomben like iran and that is just ticking away. there's the egypt problem, there's what's going on recently in al
said he's hopeful the economy will strengthen this year. the defense department has begun eliminating the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with alternative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took th
that the contest did not have the same kind of heat and high stakes for the economy for markets, for everybody's 401-k out there that people perceived and if we really got up to the brink of a potential default or united states not being able to meet all of its obligations, you know, i'm not sure on the point that bobby jindal and others were making at the meeting in north carolina, i'm not sure the -- what republicans are about, if they're not talking about the size of government, cost of government, tax and spending issues, they will have to deal with those but at the moment they didn't want to deal with them in quite such a pressurized environment so john boehner was able to convince his caucus to accept the council to move past the debt limit. they're now shifting to other fiscal fights and we will have a series through february, march, april, may. which is when the debt limit current extension is going to run out. but i think they're hoping they can take some of the pressure off. >> go ahead. gwen: what are some of the specific fixes here? talk about leadership and they want to talk about
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington and the nation were witness again today to the quadrennial pomp and color of a presidential inauguration. it marked the public start to the second obama administration, and it featured presidential appeals to extend prosperity and full freedoms to all americans. as the sun rose over the nation's capital on this monday hundreds of thousands of people began descending on the national mall to witness the occasion. officials estimated 500-700,000 attendees. that was far fewer than four years ago when nearly two million turned out. but today's crowd gave no hint of diminished enthusiasm for t
provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "
, talks with us about the debt crisis, the economy and the fed. alan blinder joins us. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: just a single cent higher. earnings from software "giant" microsoft were only a penny more than what analysts were expecting. microsoft shares slipped as much as 2% on the news in after hours trading. here are the numbers: microsoft earned $0.76 a share, down 3.7% from a year ago. revenues rose more than 2.5% to $21.5 billion, but also below expectations. the results mark the first quarter to include sales of microsoft's new windows 8 operating system, and its tablet computer, thur
that happen in eroding trust and really hurting the economy are legal. this is legal. what amgen did now is legal. should it be? is it ethical? is it the right thing for the country? absolutely not. but they literally accomplished in the back room, with their access to important people, what they could never have accomplished on the floor of the house or on the floor of the senate. >> congressman, people out there -- you're right, people out there are disgusted. but they're also despairing. they've seen this time and again. we report on it. they see it. they get angry. and then nothing happens. >> well, that's right. and that's why i'm so glad that congressman hanna, we've got a bipartisan bill here. >> a republican. >> a republican, a very good member from new york. and there's a lot of us who really take seriously that we've got two jobs. one is to try to make good decisions on policy that are going to get america going again, but the other, and each of us with a vote has this job, is to try to restore trust in the institution. and that means that when there is this kind of egregious r
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: for the first time in years, there was serious talk today of getting congress to act on immigration. senators from both sides of the aisle joined to offer propose manies and said they'll work to get them passed by summer. >> we are dealing with 11 million human beings who are here undocumented, the vast and enormous majority of whom have come here in pursuit of what all of us would recognize as the american dream. that's what we endeavor to move forward here on. >> ifill: that announcement today moved immigration reform to the front burner in congress. eight senators, f
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)